THE APPLICATION OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS IN THE PREVENTION OF POLLUTION IN THE MARITIME INDUSTRY

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THE APPLICATION OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS IN THE PREVENTION OF POLLUTION IN THE MARITIME INDUSTRY (A CASE STUDY OF RIVERS PORT)

 

CHAPTER ONE

INTRODUCTION

Background of the Study

Countries with small populations and higher levels of development may cope with globalization better, but they cannot afford to opt out of the mainstream forces that are shaping the world. There is, however, no doubt that economic and socio-political discontentment leads to existential discontent for populations who feel that they are marginalized either as individuals in their own societies or as nations unable to cope with the economic crises (Saighal, 2003). ICT is spearheading the current stage of globalization, which is proceeding further with fragmentation of the social state, and national governance, with wider consequences for national, regional and international security matters. Hence, the resurgence of the phenomenon of maritime piracy in contemporary Africa, the consequence of which negatively impacts on the continent’s rubrics, fabrics and ramifications of security: economic, social, political, commercial, energy, environmental, humanitarian, investments, developmental, revenue, etc, is the stepchild of both local and global explanations, and dimensions which calls for urgent attention.

The development and application of risk assessment and management techniques to maritime security must take into account the complex regulatory and operational context in which the maritime industry operates. The purpose here is not to propose new security-risk assessment models, but rather to point out some of the deficiencies of the existing ones in the broader perspective of the supply chain approach to maritime security. More specifically, the paper introduces an initial security risk assessment and management framework capable of reflecting the logistics scope of transport networks. The focus is to shift the subject of maritime security from the current agenda of facility-security to an extended framework of supply chain security. The document also reviews existing approaches to measuring transport security compliance costs and funding schemes adopted by industry and governments in order to finance the costs of security regulations. While advocating the adoption of any particular security measure is not within the scope of this analysis, the paper nevertheless not only argues that the new international security regulatory framework is a challenge, but also an opportunity to be seized. Although the new security requirements impose an additional regulatory burden on all concerned parties, security-driven business practices and operational procedures have the potential of improving efficiency and trade competitiveness.

1.2 Statement of the Problem

Maritime security is, indeed, a quandary (Uadiale and Yonmo, 2010a). The disintegration of central government authority, the lack of maritime security has, therefore, become a grave problem.

 

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THE APPLICATION OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS IN THE PREVENTION OF POLLUTION IN THE MARITIME INDUSTRY (A CASE STUDY OF RIVERS PORT)

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