DESIGN ANALYSIS OF CONSUMER PERCEPTION AND RESPONSE RATE TO LOCALLY MADE TEXTILE MATERIALS IN MAJOR BUSINESS DISTRICTS IN NIGERIA.

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 ABSTRACT

This study is on design analysis of consumer perception and response rate to locally made textile materials in major districts in Nigeria. The total population for the study is 200 consumers from Apapa, Lagos state. The researcher used questionnaires as the instrument for the data collection. Descriptive Survey research design was adopted for this study. A total of 133 respondents made civil servants, businessmen, businesswomen and students were used for the study. The data collected were presented in tables and analyzed using simple percentages and frequencies

 CHAPTER ONE

INTRODUCTION

  • Background of the study

The preference among Nigerians for foreign made goods is both alarming and disturbing especially when considered in the light of its effect on local industries. The general notion among some Nigerians is that locally made goods are inferior to imported and foreign made goods in terms of quality and performance to the extent that some local manufacturers have resorted, in a bid to remain relevant, to claiming a foreign origin for their products. As our society undergoes rapid changes and becomes more affluent, newer social forces make consumers spend a greater part of their income in ways remarkably different from what took place in the past. Consumers want the advantage of the affluent and latest services that technology and business can offer (Achumba, 1996).

Textile refers to the malting of cloth. A fibre is a pliable hair-like structure of length which is the building block of fabrics while a fabric is a finished product of textile, (Margil 1988). The most common uses of textile products are apparel and home furnishing. Besides these uses, textiles are indispensable to industry, agriculture, transportation, space exploration, health services and other areas, (Macfoy 1992). Textiles in the form of clothing is among the three basic needs of Man after food and shelter. Attitudes as expressions of feelings, thoughts and behaviours depend on the individuals. Attitudes are often learned from family and peer groups, (Marshall, 2000). The author further elaborated that with maturity, attitudes are included over time by societal and educational experiences. It was also noted that attitudes about clothing tend to focus on comfort, utility, conformity, economy, fashion, self-expression and status. Mashall, Jacltson, Stanley, Mary, and Touchie (2000), further stated that the concept of attitude has been divided into three components. They are affective, cognitive and behavioural. The affective component refers to emotional feelings one has about an object or entity. Fabric choices can create a wide variety of feelings or emotions. The cognitive aspect of attitude focuses on the beliefs held about fabric. A person in any believe that textile fabric is important but must be tolerated because of the dictates of the society. Someone else may feel that textile fabric is the key to social status and that by acquiring an impressive designer wardrobe, they will gain status and recognition. The behavioural component of attitude is inferred from what the person actually does. A teen may stay home from a party because she does not have the right dress. Attitudes are expressed by the types of textile fabrics and the behaviour exhibited while wearing that fabric. Self-confidence is linked with textile fabrics selected. This is why people dress neatly when attending interviews or some important occasions, (Marshall 2000). The distinction between the affective, cognitive and behavoural components of attitude should be emphasized because according to Deaux and Wrightman (1988), these three components of one person’s attitude do not always match those of the same attitude held by another person.

DESIGN ANALYSIS OF CONSUMER PERCEPTION AND RESPONSE RATE TO LOCALLY MADE TEXTILE MATERIALS IN MAJOR BUSINESS DISTRICTS IN NIGERIA.