HOW TO WRITE A GOOD ABSTRACT FOR A PROJECT

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An abstract is a condensed version of a longer work (such as a dissertation or research paper). The abstract summarizes the goals and findings of your study so that readers understand what the paper is about.

When you’ve finished the rest of the text, write the abstract at the conclusion. You must contain the following four items:

  1. Your research problems and objectives
  2. Your methods
  3. Your key results or arguments
  4. Your conclusion

The average length of an abstract is 150–300 words, although certain universities and journals have tight word limits, so make sure to verify the university or journal’s requirements.

Include the abstract on a separate page after the title page and acknowledgements but before the table of contents in a dissertation or thesis.

WHEN SHOULD AN ABSTRACT BE WRITTEN

When writing a thesis, dissertation, research paper, or submitting an article to an academic journal, you will almost always be required to include an abstract.

The abstract should always be the final thing you write. It should be an entirely separate and self-contained work, not a paraphrase of your paper or dissertation. An abstract should be completely understood on the first read. Someone who hasn’t read your entire article or any associated sources should be able to understand the abstract on its own. The most straightforward way to write an abstract is to mimic the format of the bigger work—think of it as a mini-dissertation or research article. In the majority of circumstances, this means that the abstract should have four crucial aspects.

HOW TO WRITE AN ABSTRACT

Condensing your entire dissertation into a few hundred words can be difficult, but the abstract will be the first (and sometimes only) thing people read, so it’s critical to get it right. These tips can assist you in getting started.

INVERT THE OUTLINE

There aren’t going to be the same elements in every abstract. If your research has a different structure (for example, a humanities dissertation with theme chapters that create an argument), you can compose your abstract using a reverse outlining method.

Make a list of keywords for each chapter or part and write 1-2 phrases that describe the main point or argument. This will provide you with a framework for the structure of your abstract. Then, edit the sentences to demonstrate how the argument progresses and to draw links.

The abstract should provide a simplified summary of the entire tale and should only include material present in the main text. Reread your abstract to ensure that it provides a clear explanation of your main point.

CHECK OUT THE OTHER ABSTRACTS

Reading other people’s abstracts is the greatest method to learn the conventions of writing an abstract in your area. While performing your literature review, you’ve certainly read a number of journal article abstracts; try using them as a structure and style guide.

WRITE IN A CLEAR AND CONCISE MANNER

A good abstract should be brief but powerful, so make every word count. Each sentence should explain one primary idea clearly.

Avoid needless filler words and jargon; your abstract should be understandable to those who are unfamiliar with your subject.

CONCENTRATE ON YOUR OWN RESEARCH

Because the aim of the abstract is to report on your research’s original contributions, avoid discussing other people’s work, even if you discuss it extensively in the main body.

You can include a sentence or two summarizing the scholarly background to place your research in context and demonstrate its significance to a larger debate, but no individual publications should be mentioned.