ASSESSING MARITIME SECURITY, INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY APPLICATION

0
368

ASSESSING MARITIME SECURITY, INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY APPLICATION (A CASE STUDY OF RIVERS PORT)  

 

ABSTRACT

This study was intended to evaluate the maritime security, information and communication technology. The study employed the descriptive and explanatory design; questionnaires in addition to library research were applied in order to collect data. Primary and secondary data sources were used and data was analyzed using the correlation statistical tool at 5% level of significance which was presented in frequency tables and percentage. The respondents under the study were 68 employees of the Rivers port.

The study findings revealed that maritime security, information and communication technology can be assessed; based on the findings from the study, efforts should be made by the Nigerian government and stakeholders in further promoting maritime security in Nigeria, as this would encourage more investors.

CHAPTER ONE

INTRODUCTION

Background of the study

Worldwide Port and Maritime operations and their associated facilities and infrastructure collectively represent one of the single greatest unaddressed challenges to the security of nations and the global economy today. The reason that ports and shipping activity are so difficult to secure lies primarily in their technology. Ports are typically large, asymmetrical activities dispersed over hundreds of acres of land and water so that they can simultaneously accommodate ship, truck and rail traffic, petroleum product/liquid offload, storage or piping, and container storage. The movement of freight, cargo (solid or liquid), and transport through a port is generally on a “queuing” system, meaning that any delay snarls all operations. Whether or not delays are related to security, security generally falls by the wayside in the interest of time management or convenience. Globally, there are very few uniform standards for point-to-point control of security on containers, cargoes, vessels or crews – a port’s security in one nation remains very much at the mercy of a port’s security, or lack thereof, in another nation. Organized crime is entrenched in many ports and a large majority of them still do not require background checks on dock workers, crane operators or warehouse employees. Most ports lease large portions of their facility to private terminal operating companies, who are responsible for their own security. The result of this is a “balkanized”, uneven system of port security and operations management as a whole.

1.2 Statement of the problem

Maritime security is, indeed, a quandary (Uadiale and Yonmo, 2010a). The disintegration of central government authority, the lack of maritime security has, therefore, become a grave problem.

 

DOWNLOAD COMPLETE PROJECT MATERIAL

ASSESSING MARITIME SECURITY, INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY APPLICATION (A CASE STUDY OF RIVERS PORT)  

Leave a Reply