A RESEARCH ON THE IMPACT OF WEANING DIET FOR A NINE MONTH: 9 MONTHS-1YEAR

0
4

A RESEARCH ON THE IMPACT OF WEANING DIET FOR A NINE MONTH: 9 MONTHS-1YEAR (EDUCATION PROJECT TOPICS AND MATERIALS)

 

CHAPTER ONE

INTRODUCTION

BACKGROUND OF THE STUDY

There is a lack of sound evidence from appropriately designed on the efforts of weaning (introduction of solid foods) on outcomes such as growth and mobility. This is surprising, given the radial shift in the dietary pattern of infants which occurs over a relatively short period of time at around 12-17 week of age; as a result of the weaning process. This shift is from a diet comprising a high fat, low protein single food, breast or formula milk, to a more complex mixture of foods, which is relatively high in protein with a low to exposure of infants to bacterial and chemical contamination, and to food allergens, coincides with this dietary change. Most studies relating to infant nutrition have focused on milk feeding, and the effect of introducing solid foods has been relatively neglected.

Dietary surveys of presumably health populations, factorial approaches and balance techniques are the methods used most often to estimate nutrient requirements. None of particularly satisfactory because they seldom adequately address growing concerns that nutrients intakes supports long-term health and optimal functional capacities rather than just avoid acute deficiency states. These concerns are most evident when considered the nutrient needs of infants because of the paucity of data for estimating most nutrient requirements and the limited number of functionally relevant outcome measures for this age group. As these limitations apply to nearly all the sections these follow, they will not be repeated. Growth is the most commonly used functional outcomes measure of nutrient adequacy. This outcome is particularly useful for screening purpose because the normal progression of growth is dependent on many needs being met and normally. However, this strength also betrays this outcomes principal weakness since abnormal growth is highly non specific. The single or multiple etiologies of abnormal growth are usually difficult to ascertain confidently. This is most apparent in the different in most standard pediatric test.

This outcome is key to present approaches for interpreting dietary surveys, calculating factoral estimates and evaluating outcomes of balance studies. Specific issues, which mating nutrient needs by each of the above-listed method

DOWNLOAD COMPLETE PROJECT MATERIAL

A RESEARCH ON THE IMPACT OF WEANING DIET FOR A NINE MONTH: 9 MONTHS-1YEAR (EDUCATION PROJECT TOPICS AND MATERIALS)

Leave a Reply