QUANTITATIVE IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF CASSAVA DERIVATIVE PRODUCTS IN THE CROSS-RIVER STATE, NIGERIA, IKOM LOCAL GOVERNMENT

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CHAPTER ONE

 

1.0     INTRODUCTION

1.1 Background                  

Agriculture continues to be the backbone of Nigeria’s economy, despite the petroleum industry’s dominant position as the country’s principal source of foreign money (Oyejide 1986). A major portion of the population obtains its income from agriculture and allied industries, making it the largest non-oil exporter, the largest employer of labor, and a significant contributor to wealth creation and poverty alleviation in addition to its contribution to GDP (NEEDS, 2004). The idea of adapting measures for assuring natural food security and a sustainable way of life, particularly for developing countries, has fully taken hold around the world. In light of this, many Nigerians in rural areas have taken to processing cassava into its derivatives for food and income. The present push for greater levels of Under the presidential effort on cassava, commercializing cassava processing necessitates scaling up cassava processing in Nigeria (Ekwe and Ekwe, 2005).

One of the main food crops grown in Nigeria is cassava. Nigeria produces the most cassava in the world each year—34,000 tonnes—making it the most of any nation (Adebayo and Sangosina, 2005). Nigeria produced 6.8 million tonnes of cassava annually in 1982, placing it sixth in the world. Nigeria’s cassava production grew through the cassava multiplication program (CMP) (1986–1996), going from 41 million tonnes in 2005 to 49 million tonnes in 2008. (FAO, 2008).

The crop is currently grown in almost every region of the nation and is the main food crop used to generate foreign cash (Isiorhaorja and Dodge, 2005). In Nigeria, cassava is consumed frequently, up to twice daily (Nweke, 2004), and it provides many families with more than 1000 calories per day. With a sauce comprised of ingredients high in protein, vitamins, and minerals, cassava is eaten. Some people even have breakfast, lunch, and dinner with cassava (Haggblade and Zulu, 2003). In Nigeria, cassava is crucial to the economy and nutrition of rural households with few resources (NRCRI, 1996). Other benefits of cassava include its capacity to withstand high temperatures and its ability to store well in the soil for several months. conditions. Because of this, cassava has earned the moniker “famine security crop” (Philip, 2005). Both the bitter and the sweet varieties of cassava contain cyanogenic glucosides, which, once harvested, degrade into hydro-cyanic acid. Raw cassava is extremely dangerous for both humans and animals to consume due to the acid. Therefore, processing cassava is crucial to get rid of this toxicity and improve its flavor and shelf life.

Cassava processing is a household activity; children assist with peeling, but women handle the majority of the work. This processing prevents microbiological and physiological deterioration, lowers the level of cyanogenic glucosides, and transforms the roots into more marketable goods (Asiedu, 1989). However, a number of limitations exist with regard to cassava processing, limiting the crop’s economic impact on the country (Hawn, 1989; Henry, 1999 in Adebayo and Sangosina, 2005). For instance, the cyanide level of cassava is a major barrier to its use, but it can be lowered by innovative processing techniques (Oyewole and Aibor, 1992). Its processing is further hampered by a lack of funding and inadequate storage facilities.

TABLE OF CONTENT
Title page- – – – – – – – – i
Approval page – – – – – – – -ii
Dedication – – – – – – – – -iii
Acknowledgement – – – – – – – -iv
Abstract – – – – – – – – – -v
Table of content – – – – – – – -vi

CHAPTER ONE
INTRODUCTION – – – – – – – -1
1.0 Background of the study – – – – -1
1.1 Statement of the problem – – – – -5
1.2 Purpose of the study – – – – – -6
1.3 Significance of the study – – – – -8
1.4 Research questions – – – – – -9
1.5 Scope of the study – – – – – – -10

CHAPTER TWO

LITERATURE REVIEW – – – – – – -11

CHAPTER THREE

Research methodology – – – – – – -39
Design of study – – – – – – – -40
Area of study – – – – – – – – -40
Population of the study – – – – – – -41
Sample and sampling techniques – – – – -41
Instrument for data collection – – – – -41
Method of data collection – – – – – -42
Method of data analysis – – – – – – -43

CHAPTER FOUR

Presentation, analysis and interpretation of data – -48
Discussion of findings – – – – – – -56

CHAPTER FIVE

Summary of findings – – – – – – -60
Conclusion – – – – – – – – -61
Recommendations – – – – – – – -62
Suggestions for further research – – – – -64
References – – – – – – – – -65
Appendix I – – – – — – – – -68
Questionnaire. – – – – – – – -69

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